Wrea Green Car Carnival – Sunday 27th May

The Lancashire Automobile Club has been invited to this fantastic event which raises funds for the Trinity Hospice. The event is set on the green and is a most enjoyable event with Veteran, Vintage, Classic and Super Cars plus some interesting motorcycles and commercial vehicles with the odd Formula 1 car making and appearance.

Full details are on out events calender. For full details and entry form please call Sally or Christine on 01772 682159

Acknowledgements to Jan Hayes Photography for the photo.

Bowker Salon Prive Friday 15th June

15th June Browsholme Hall

Friday 15th June. Lancashire Automobile Club Members havce been invited to enter this unique event at Browsholme Hall to raise money for the Blackburn Cathederal Appeal. The event is open to Vintage, Classic and post Classic cars. Full details and entry forms are available from Peter WEhitman email peterwhitman@yahoo.com.
See Events Diary for further details

Mike Wood Recalls the 1968 London Sydney Marathon

To celebrate the 1968 London to Sydney Marathon Mike Wood will be giving a presentation with slides recalling his involvement in the event navigatingf a BLMC 1800 (Land Crab).

Many of the pictures are unique being taken by Mike on the reccee for the event. Mike’s memories of the event and the stories behind it are not to be missed.

The event will be held on Wednesday 24th October at Whalley Golf Club. Please contact Eileen (eileen.dyson@btinternet.com) to get you name on the list. Tickets will be available later this year.

Important news from the Federation of British Historic Vehicle Clubs

18 December 2017

For immediate release

Department for Transport (DfT) Guidance on Substantial Change of Historic Vehicles.

  1.  The Guidance sets out the definition of a Vehicle of Historic Interest (VHI), vehicles which will, from May 2018, be entitled to be exempt from taking a vehicle (MoT) test.
  2. The Guidance reflects the outcome of intensive discussions between the DfT and the Federation of British Historic Vehicle Clubs (FBHVC). FBHVC wishes to express its appreciation of the open and collaborative manner in which the DfT approached these discussions.
  3. In the discussions FBHVC was careful to take account of all possible members of the historic vehicle family.
  4. The Guidance supersedes all previous potential criteria released for discussion by DfT.
  5. The Guidance makes clear that it does not in any way affect DVLA’s registration criteria and processes which remain unchanged.
  6. The Government included motorcycles in the Motor Vehicles (Tests) (Amendment) Regulations 2017. As the Guidance implements the Regulations, DfT could not accept FBHVC’s representations, based upon the requirements of the EU Directive, regarding historic motorcycles, so they are included in the Guidance.
  7. Following STRONG representations by FBHVC, a vehicle may generally be a VHI if relevant changes were undertaken more than 30 years previously. This will be a rolling 30 years and replaces the fixed 1988 date previously proposed by DfT.
  8. Major points of note are:
    1. The process is one of self-declaration.
    2. Owners will only be required to declare their vehicle to be a VHI if they wish to be exempted from an annual MOT Test.
    3. All vehicles will still be able to be tested if their owners wish
    4. The criteria are generic and permit changes made, less than 30 years prior to the declaration, which improve efficiency, safety, preservation or environmental performance.
    5. Those vehicles registered on a Q plate, as kits or built up classics are not entitled to be declared as VHIs until forty years after they were registered.
    6. For motorcycles only the criteria of Q plates, kits and built up classics prevent declaration as a VHI.
  9. The Guidance refers to “a marque or historic vehicle experts”. A list will be published on the website of the Federation of British Historic Vehicle Clubs by 30th April 2018. Vehicle owners wishing to confirm if they may declare their vehicle as a VHI, may choose to contact the appropriate nominee from this list
  10. FBHVC will be explaining the Guidance in full in its first Newsletter of 2018 and as soon as possible on its website at fbhvc.co.uk.
  11. Text of the Guidance is at: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/668274/vehicles-of-historical-interest-substantial-change-guidance.pdf

ENDS

2018 Classic Challenge

The Challenge enables drivers, navigators and organisers to claim points for each event. Points will be recorded on a simple scorecard which must be sent to the Championship Compiler, Chris Lee, before the 20th January 2019. Full regulations and Scorecard are available from Chris Lee – chrislee1275@aol.com

The Lancashire Automobile Club ‘Classic Challenge’ is a social challenge and does not reflect any element of competition within the events or for completion of any event. Merely taking part, as an entrant or organiser, is sufficient for points to be claimed in the challenge.

  • Points may be claimed for each Lancashire Automobile Club Classic event by drivers, navigators and organsiers who are fully paid up members of the Club on 25th October 2018.
  • Organisers of events may claim points for events as set out below
  • Lancashire Automobile Club Classic events are defined as:
  • Any 2 LAC Social Events
  • St Georges Day Run                                 22nd April
  • The Fellsman                                             12th May
  • Manchester to Blackpool Car Run     10th June
  • Coast to Coast Car Run                           14th July
  • Highland 3 Day Classic Tour                21st – 23rd September (see note below)

 

  • Points will be awarded as follows:
  • Attending LAC Social events in 2018 – 5 points (max 2 events)
  • Entering event                      5 points
  • Starting Road Event           20 points (see note on Highland 3 Day below)
  • Taking part in Concours (Manchester to Blackpool and Coast to Coast)                                                                30 points
  • Note – Highland 3 Day Owing to the nature of this event points may be claimed as follows:Entering the event               5 points              Starting Day ‘0’      5 points         Starting Day One 10 points                              Starting Day Two 10 points               Starting Day Three 10 points
  • To claim points entrants should fill in the Championship ‘scorecard’ and send it to Chris Lee.

Scorecards must be sent to the Challenge Organiser on or before the 20th January 2019.

Classic Challenge 2018

Lancashire Automobile Club Ltd

Classic Challenge 2018

This Challenge will be staged to promote interest in the Clubs’ events and to encourage some friendly rivalry between members. The Classic Challenge is open to all members of the Lancashire Automobile Club. Points are scored for taking part in Lancashire Automobile Club Classic events. Full regulations are available on the Club web site.

The Challenge is open to both drivers and navigators with trophies awarded at the Club’s Annual Dinner Dance and Prize Presentation 2019 at Mitton Hall.

The Challenge enables drivers and navigators to claim points for each event they take part in. Points will be recorded on a simple scorecard by the entrant submitted at the end of the season.

Challenge Rounds are:

o   Any one LAC Social Event

o   St Georges Day Run 22nd April

o   The Fellsman 12th May

o   Manchester to Blackpool Classic Car Run  and Concours 10th June

o   Coast to Coast Classic Car Run and Concours Saturday 14th July

     Highland 3 Day Classic Tour 21st – 23rd September 

Donation to North West Blood Bikes Lancs and Lakes

The LAC is proud to support Blood Bikes. As you know we raised money at the Barry Whizzo Williams event for this worthy cause. Set out below is there letter acknowledging our donation,

Our Next Ride May Save a Life.
Will Yours? Date: 16/03/ 2016 “Volunteers Who Care”

NWBB-Lancs & Lakes,
Willowbank House,
The Clough,
Clayton-le-Woods,
Chorley. PR6 7DG Registered Charity 1147282

Lancashire Automobile Club Lancashire

Dear All On behalf of North West Blood Bikes Lancs and Lakes I would like to thank you for your kind donation of £ 250.00
As you know, our members provide an out of hours motor-cycle delivery service, which supports the NHS. Providing this transport costs money and many of our riders pay their own fuel bills and use their own bikes, but we do an emer-gency service also with specially equipped motorcycles with blues and twos and the cost of running them is quite expensive, so donations such as yours are fantastic.

To date we have handled almost 20,000 call outs in the 46 months we have been running and the numbers are ever increasing and without help from organisations like yours we would not be able to do it. Conservative estimates based on a standard taxi fare of £40 show that we have saved the local NHS in Lancashire and South Lakes well over £800,000 so far, and included runs as far away as Leeds, Sheffield, Birmingham, Cardiff Abingdon, Charing Cross & Great Ormond Street.
Thank you from all of us at NWBB Lancs & Lakes.

Yours sincerely Scott M Miller

Name: Scott M Miller Vice Chairman, Trustee Email: scott@millersuk.co.uk Web: www.nwbb-lancs.org Tel: 01254 395552 Mob: 07860 883430
Grass Roots
Motor Sport

Entrants Report on 2016 St Georges Day

Drive it day 2016

With classic car values soaring, it’s easy to forget that their original purpose was to move us from A to B as frugally, as fast or as fashionably as possible. Drive-it day seeks to remind us of that.

Each year, on the nearest Sunday to the 23rd of April, classic car owners are encouraged to dust off their pride and joy, blowing away the cobwebs on the open road to usher in the start of the summer show season.

Drive it day commemorates the thousand mile trial of 1900, in which the Royal Automobile Club participated in a round trip setting off from London and travelling via Bristol, Birmingham, Manchester, Derby, Kendal, Carlisle, Edinburgh, Newcastle, Leeds, Sheffield, and Nottingham before finishing back in London.

Unlike the original event which was spread across 19 days, the celebration is confined to just one day, with runs and rallies organised countrywide — and that’s where I’d be.

Dad and I would be joining the Lancashire Automobile Club’s St George’s Day run, taking in the best backroads East Lancashire and West Yorkshire have to offer.

We’d be taking part in Dad’s 1969 Lotus Elan, with him in the driver’s seat, and me crunching the numbers and using my legendary (ha!) prowess as a navigator.

Upon signing on, we received our run plaque, some notes on the route (including the bizarre story of the Sabden treacle mine), and directions presented in tulip road book style.

After fuelling up on bacon and coffee, we were ready to set off in the Elan, joining an automotive melting pot of vehicles classic and modern, popular and priceless, all taking to the roads in the pursuit of nothing more than a good drive out. Aside from some characteristic April rain showers and some uncharacteristic April snow showers, that’s exactly what we’d get.

While the organisers could do nothing about the weather, their preparation with the route and the accompanying paperwork was such that we were confident of an easy afternoon’s navigating.

After a short time queuing we reached the start line and the marshals waved us on our way with the union flag.

Despite the organisers staggering the starters, it wasn’t long before any slower cars at the front of the pack were caught, and a convoy of classics developed — much to the amusement of the locals, who waved and smiled as car after car passed by.

After the relatively sluggish first stint, the rest stop at Helwith Bridge gave us a chance to change tack.

We’d been one of the last cars away at the start line, hoping that letting the others gain a bit of ground first would give us a clear run — not so. As we pulled into the car park of the Helwith Bridge Inn, we realised we could kill time more creatively.

Whilst drivers and navigators piled into the pub for coffee and cake, Dad and I patrolled the car park and sized up the other entrants. Having caught up some of the first starters, we had a fair bit of extra time to look over the cars, weighing up the variety of the entrants.

The run is by no means a serious competitive event — more a fun way to spend a few hours on a Sunday, but there were some serious machines on display.

A prized Ferrari 330 GT +2 sat a few paces away from a Volvo Amazon whose dashboard was cluttered with all manner of rally instruments for measuring miles and keeping time. A pre-war Rolls Royce shared the car park with an equally immaculate Mini Clubman, resplendent in its oh-so-70s Tundra green paint.

With the poor weather predicted, it’s a credit to the owners that so many of these valuable cars were brought out and driven, when they’d likely be mollycoddled as collectibles by many others.

As Dad and I finished our circuit of the car park, the other entrants began emptying out of the pub, ready to start the second leg. With that, we went inside, pulled up a couple of chairs and sat down to a lunch of coffee and cake to put some space between the main group and ourselves.

When we eventually resurfaced, the Elan stood alone in the car park. Success.

The roads of the second leg weren’t unlike the first — the only difference was the speed at which we’d be taking them. With mile after mile of clear air ahead of us, we hustled the Elan around the twists and turns of West Yorkshire, before dropping back down into East Lancashire.

On the way down, we encountered switchbacks on the steeper sections — the like of which you’d expect to find on more continental roads.

The terrain levelled out, the roads widened, and the pace increased — it was only a matter of time before we caught a few of the stragglers which courteously waved us by, allowing us to go on unheeded.

After getting our eye in with the first leg of the route, it was pretty easy to pick up where we left off, tackling the 30 mile return leg without any drama.

We pulled into the car park, greeted by smiles and waves from the same marshals who had waved us off at the start.

Whilst Dad and I were happy to lap up any adulation, it only took a look over our shoulders to realise where the praise was due. In the previous owner’s hands, the Elan had managed only 50 miles per year – we’d broken that record by the time we’d reached the rest stop at the Helwith Bridge Inn. The little Lotus, now ticking itself cool, had completed the 80 mile run without complaint.

Sure, this hardly compared to the Mille Miglia or the Targa Florio, and I’m sure none of us taking part would expect to be treated like the daredevil mavericks taking on these gruelling events, but over the 80 miles we’d covered, we’d all proven that in less than perfect conditions, our cars were not only capable of being driven, but enjoyed too.

Matthew Parkinson